Want to get your wedding featured on your favorite blog? Here are seven details you can’t overlook

You’re hosting the biggest, prettiest party you’ve ever planned. You’re spending money and getting compliments already. Why NOT try to get your wedding featured on your favorite blog? If you’re already putting in the work, it’s a nice added benefit!

The biggest mistake brides make who want to get featured

Too often, brides go through the wedding planning process trying to keep focused on the important aspects of their day, dismissing the reality that they’d genuinely enjoy seeing their day inspiring other brides on their favorite blog. All of a sudden, they determine AFTER all the decisions are made that they can’t ignore that feeling and they really do want to shoot for the stars and submit their wedding for publication. The problem is, they’re already too late. There’s nothing worse than arriving at a wedding and finding out the bride would love to see her day published in her favorite blog.

If there’s a chance you’re interested in publication, be honest about that early in the process and know this: It’s okay to want that! I give you permission! You’re not a diva, you’re planning a beautiful, intentional, and personal day and think it could inspire others. Let’s work together to give it our best effort!

7 details you can't overlook if you want to get your wedding published

Want to know what blogs and magazines really look for in wedding submissions? Here are the details you can’t overlook if you’d like to get your wedding featured.

1. Choose the right players for your creative team.

(As seen in The Knot Chicago Magazine, pp 70-74 with planning by Shannon Gail Weddings, Florals by Stems Chicago, Venue, Artifact Events)

It’s important that the creative team you hire (photographer, planner, stylist, floral designer, venue) are familiar with wedding publication-they should know how to style for it, shoot for it, and still be focused on giving you the dream day you’ve hoped for. Look for people who’ve been published recently and regularly.

2. Choose a wedding dress that enhances your overall design.

(Left: Lian Carlo as seen in The Knot Chicago Magazine; Right: Nouvelle Amsale, coming soon to Style Me Pretty)

Dresses can make or break a wedding submission. it has to align with your overall design and has to be fashion forward. Check out the trends at New York Bridal Fashion Week (bell sleeves are comin’ in hot this year as is minimal and modern elements) and look on blogs and in magazine for the brands who pay for advertising with them. Chances are, they’ll want to give those brands publicity and will increase your chances of getting picked up.

3. Develop a cohesive event design.

(As seen on Ruffled Blog with planning by Italia Celebrations at Villa la Vedetta)

You can have the prettiest florals at your tables, but all is lost if there isn’t some kind of design statement or point of view you’re making that carries throughout your whole day. Blogs don’t care as much about the one pretty centerpiece, or that cutie pie sweetheart table, or your wowzah dress. You can have all the pretty individual elements in the world, but they need to tell a story and share a point of view. The best way to accomplish this is by hiring a skilled and experienced planner/stylist. It makes all the difference! Need recommendations? Sign up here for our vendor recommendation freebie.

4. Prioritize floral design.

(as seen in Wisconsin Bride Magazine; designed by Flower & Bee)

Floral design is one of the most influential aspects of wedding features! People just die for posts that showcase beautiful floral inspiration and design, so blogs are constantly on the lookout for fresh ideas, design trends, and color palettes in the world of floral design. If there’s something you go crazy over, let it be florals.

(planning and design by Cherry Blossom Events, florals by Daffodil Parker)

5. Choose a publication-worthy venue.

(Villa Terrace and Milwaukee Art Museum; coming soon to Style Me Pretty)

Closely behind florals is a statement-making venue. While golf clubs and ballrooms were made for hosting large gatherings, publications are often looking for something a bit more personal and pretty. A winery, private estate, piece of modern architecture or venue with historic charm (think european historic, like chateaus, and villas, not kitchy 50 year old American-historic) will be winners. On top of that, plan an outdoor event. Publications almost exclusively prefer to show off natural light, so plan a day outdoors, and if you need a rain plan, schedule a clear topped tent to keep that light coming in.

6. Consider lighting when constructing your timeline.

To attract a publisher, it's not only important to consider what is being photographed, but how those things are photographed. Good lighting elevates the quality of your images and makes everything looks its best.

If you're planning an beautiful outdoor ceremony, consider where the light will fall at your ceremony time. Bright, overhead midday lighting will detract from even the most beautiful of designs, so we recommend having your ceremony just a few hours before sunset. 

If you're having an outdoor reception, consider the best time for the space to be photographed when building it into your timeline. The closer to sunset the better! While every moment of your day can't be shot in that warm, glowy light right as the sun sets, prioritizing the best light for the most impactful moments of your event design can go a long way toward getting published

7. Communicate your goals with your creative team well in advance.

Shooting for publication is an intense game and requires planning and extra work. We need to know this early so we can make sure we're shooting both for you and for the publication you like. If you like Style Me Pretty and would like to aim for a feature there, tell your team early in the planning process and ask the question “what do you need for this?” For photography, it will impact how we schedule for your day.

We’ll want to plan our styling, coordinate with the florist, make a list of details to photograph and ensure we have quality time to photograph everything well. Telling us after we only had 30 minutes to photograph details is the equivalent of a death sentence to your dream of publication.

Communicate what you’d like EARLY and OFTEN and listen to your team when they give suggestions or tell you how to get it.